Nicaragua eliminates PCR test requirement for travelers

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From this Thursday, June 16, it will no longer be necessary to present a negative PCR test for covid-19, as a migratory condition to enter Nicaragua, announced the Ministry of Health. The measure applies to travelers with a complete vaccination record.

Similarly, the Civil Aeronautics Institute said the requirement for crew members and passengers to present a negative test has also been removed.

According to the press release signed by the Minister of Health, Martha Reyes, people who do not have a complete vaccination schedule must still test negative for covid-19 within 72 hours of collection until entry into the country.

With this resolution, Nicaragua joins the other countries of Central America and North America in repealing this measure, since it was the only one in the region to keep it in force.

El Salvador was the first country in Central America to eliminate PCR testing as a migration requirement and this year Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, Costa Rica and Panama have joined them, nations that do not require henceforth only the travellers’ card or proof of vaccination.

In Nicaragua, the immigration health requirement was imposed on July 14, 2020 and was the only mandatory preventive measure established by the Ortega-Murillo government, to contain and control the transmission of the disease. However, this has been used by the regime as an excuse to deny foreigners and “undesirable” nationals entry into the country.

The latest known case is that of Nicaraguan journalist Tifani Roberts, who, a day before the requirement was waived, was denied entry to the country because Minsa did not accept her PCR test.

“Dear Passenger: The proof of your test submitted has not been accepted by the Nicaraguan authorities. Your entry into Nicaragua has not been authorized by the Nicaraguan immigration authorities. You will not be permitted to board. Please contact the Nicaraguan Embassy,” reads the email received by Roberts from Avianca Airlines.

This article was originally published in Spanish in Confidential and translated by Havana Times

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